Hermès Thinks Outside The Box In Colorful Campaign

April 23, 2019

By SARAH RAMIREZ

French fashion house Hermès is bringing a playful and artistic spirit to its latest silk scarf campaign.

Its iconic accessory is being refreshed with a new series of prints, and the “Not So Square” short film shows how Hermès celebrates individuals’ self-expression without being overly traditional. In various scenes, the vignette also portrays the classic scarves as inspiring works of art.

“This is such a fun a playful ad – mostly due to mix of reality and fantasy – a dreamscape of self-expression that is very on-brand for Hermès,” said Daymon Bruck, CCO and partner at The O Group, Seattle. “It’s evocative, conceptual, memorable and, perhaps most importantly, free from standard visual conventions and expected fashion norms.”

Mr. Bruck is not affiliated with Hermès, but agreed to comment as an industry expert. Hermès was reached for comment.

NOT SO SQUARE

Hermès’ silk squares have been one of luxury’s defining accessories for nearly a century, but a new film is putting a different perspective on them.

The film begins with the camera zooming out of a scarf in the iconic orange Hermès hue. The setting is revealed to be a small stage, with several women dressed simply in black leotards dancing with various scarves.

Hermès I Not so square

Hermès’ “Not So Square” shows many ways people wear its iconic scarves

As the women pose together, the camera zooms in on another scarf with a print of a ladder looking up at a cloudy sky. Through a kaleidoscope-style effect, the scene then transforms into a pink sky with soaring silk kites made out of another print.

Two women are seen flying the Hermès kites on a scenic beach, each accessorizing their hair with their own scarves.

Again, the scene evolves and this time a woman is seen in the middle of the dessert. She is gently falling into an enormous, life-size scarf with a blue-and-white mountain print, before delicately waving the silk square in the wind.

The scarf blows away, and a woman from the opening scene gently grabs it from the sky. She is on a city rooftop and ties the scarf around her neck.

A group of woman, again dressed in black, form a square on the roof. Each is wearing a colorful scarf, tied in numerous ways.

The camera approaches the original woman, who forms a square with her hands. Once the hands move, a new scene at an art gallery is revealed.

Several women and one man are studying large works of art. The abstract prints resemble the colorful scarves each person wears.

Hermès portrays its scarves as artwork. Image credit: Hermès

One woman undoes the scarf in her hair, and the setting changes for a final time.

A group of people are climbing a mountainside, each waving a silk scarf and ribbons on a flag pole. As they ascend to the summit, the scene is joyous and celebratory.

SPOTLIGHT ON SCARVES

Hermès has often placed special attention on its scarves.

Last fall, the fashion group excited fans of its history with scarves through a pop-up concept that traveled to various cities.

Through the Hermès Carré Club, the brand gave guests an inside look at what it takes to create the scarves. The pop-up appeared in North America, Asia and Europe (see story).

Hermès campaigns have also taken a whimsical tone as of late.

In a recent film, two actors audition for an unseen director, responding to a number of quick-paced situations thrown at them while modeling 32 of the brand’s accessories. This short showcases the diversity of roles that Hermès can help consumers fill while also playfully promoting the collection (see story).

“Hermès is saying, ‘Once you have the freedom to be yourself, march to the mountain tops and share your personal expression with the world – proudly and boldly,’” Mr. Bruck said.

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